Join us for our in-person workshops

WCHRI is pleased to offer four “workshops” at Research Day on October 18. We will be hosting two workshops and two “Deep Dives.” These Deep Dives are less hands-on and more of an in-depth look into a specific topic.

Workshops

Session 1: DIVERT-Sponsored Promoting Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Anti-Racism in Biomedical Research – Introduction

In this educational session the presenter will discuss equity, diversity, inclusion and anti-racism in biomedical research, focusing on the research cycle, from the generation of a research question to knowledge translation. In this introductory session, concepts will be introduced with the second workshop session providing opportunity for participants to reflect on and participants will learn how it relates to research methodology and methods through case discussions.

Session 2: DIVERT-Sponsored Promoting Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Anti-Racism in Biomedical Research – Reflection/Practice

 In this educational session the presenter will discuss equity, diversity, inclusion and anti-racism in biomedical research, focusing on the research cycle, from the generation of a research question to knowledge translation. In this workshop session, concepts introduced in the first session will be reflected on and participants will learn how it relates to research methodology and methods through case discussions.

Speaker Biography: Dr. Saleem Razack joined faculty at UBC/BC Children’s Hospital on January 1, 2023, after a 25-year career as a pediatric intensivist and medical educator/education researcher at McGill University.  He is a graduate of the University of Toronto. His research Interests in Medical Education include the intersection of assessment and professionalism with representation, equity, diversity, inclusion and anti-racism, for which he has had SSHRC and CIHR support. He is the recipient of the AFMC May Cohen award for outstanding contributions to equity in medical education and research, the Haile T. Debas award for contributions to equity in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at McGill, and the Pediatric Chairs of Canada award for outstanding contribution to Medical Education. He is excited to start anew at UBC and hopes to serve in and contribute to the vibrant scholarly community in health professions education at UBC.

Are you thinking about what comes next after your degree? 

Do you constantly feel the need to be ‘doing more’ to have a great resume? 

Not sure how your skills and hobbies translate to your dream career? 

You’re not alone! Career stress and thinking about ‘what comes next’ is common among university students. Join Holly Mathias, PhD student (School of Public Health), for a morning of career exploration and reflection. This interactive workshop builds from the award winning “It All Adds Up” workshop. Students can expect to participate in creative self-reflection, work together with other students to identify their skills and what sets them apart from others, and learn about resources to support them on their career journey.  

Facilitator Biography: Holly Mathias is a PhD student in the School of Public Health and trainee with the Inner-City Health and Wellness Program. Her research on family caregiving for people who use drugs in rural Alberta has been well-recognized with a SSHRC Vanier Scholarship, 2023 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Scholarship, and CUP-PaCET award. Holly sits on the WCHRI trainee advisory committee and is dedicated to supporting other students interested in women and children’s health research. Holly co-created the It All Adds Up workshop with Queen’s University Career Services as an undergraduate student wondering how her background in English Literature and Global Development could lead to a career in Public Health. Since that time, the workshop been adapted in over 40 universities and colleges across Canada, and was recognized with an Excellence in Innovation award from the Canadian Association of Career Educators and Employers in 2016-17. She is excited to facilitate this workshop with WCHRI trainees.

Deep dives

The workshop, Indigenous Health and Taking Reconciliaction, will discuss the history of residential schools in Canada and ways that people can join in on reconciliation. Shannon will share several suggestions that incorporate simple ways for people to gain knowledge and understanding of Indigenous people in Canada. She will also include information about the segregated healthcare system that existed in Canada for Indigenous people. Potential grad students heading into the medical professions should at least be aware of the history before trying to build relationships with Indigenous patients.  This is one way that individuals can participate in the 94 Calls to Action and keep the healing of Canada moving forward. 

Speaker Biography: Shannon Cornelsen is a Cree mother, researcher and University of Alberta student

Shannon is an urban member of the Saddle Lake Cree Nation living in Edmonton, Canada. Shannon’s adventurous spirit has taken her to live abroad in the UK, Germany, and most recently Northern Iraq with her children and cat in tow. Life has continuously presented Shannon with both opportunities for change and lessons in human kindness, including starting her B.A. in Native Studies at the age of 50. As an Indigenous Peoples interpreter at Fort Edmonton Park, Shannon strives to communicate the effects of intergenerational trauma and PTSD on the children of residential school Survivors to the general public.

Have you ever wondered how to effectively share your research with healthcare professionals, administrators, and the public? Have you been asked to *gasp* give a media interview? Or create a visual abstract or infographic about your manuscript and have no idea where to start? Join Drs. Samina Ali and Elise Kammerer for a workshop on effective science communication where you will learn how to tailor your message for your intended audience.

Speaker Biography: Dr. Elise Kammerer is a Knowledge Broker for the national knowledge mobilization network Solutions for Kids in Pain (SKIP) and is based at the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Dr. Kammerer has worked as a knowledge mobilization professional for over a decade and is passionate about the co-development of integrated knowledge translation projects with patients and families. She is also a PhD student in Pediatrics at the University of Alberta, where she is collaborating with people with lived experience to study the acute pain experiences of marginalized children in the emergency department. 

Speaker Biography: Dr. Samina Ali is a Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, the Chair-Elect for Pediatric Emergency Research Canada, and the Western Canadian Hub Lead for Solutions for Kids in Pain, a national knowledge mobilization hub. She recently completed a Mayday Pain and Society Fellowship in Science Communications (2019). Dr. Ali is a national award-winning researcher, mentor, educator, and leader. She holds national and international funding for studies informing best care for children with acute injury and illness, and has published over 180 articles in this area. Dr. Ali has had her works featured in local (EDify magazine, Edmonton Sun) and national/international (Global Health Matters, Globe & Mail, CBC) media and podcasts.